- Yes Prime Minister 1.2 Quote
26 plays

Jim Hacker: “Humphrey, who is it who has the last word about the government of Britain? The British Cabinet or the American President?”
Sir Humphrey: “You know that is a fascinating question. We often discuss it.”
Jim Hacker: “And what conclusion have you arrived at?”
Sir Humphrey: “Well, I must admit to be a bit of a heretic. I think it is the British Cabinet. But I know I am in the minority.”

 - Yes Minister 1.7 Quote
52 plays

Sir Desmond: “So it all boils down to the Industry Co-partnership Committee. Still, I find that quite acceptable.”
Sir Humphrey: “Well, it is within the gift of my Minister, and you would only put in appearances once or twice a month.”
Sir Desmond: “Are there lots of papers?”
Sir Humphrey: “Yes, but it wouldn’t be awfully necessary to read them.”
Sir Desmond: “Then I wouldn’t have anything to say at the monthly meetings.”
Sir Humphrey: “Splendid, I can see you’re just the chap I’m looking for.”

 - Yes Minister 1.1 Quote
54 plays

 Bernard Woolley: “Minister, allow me to present Sir Humphrey Appleby, Permanent Under Secretary of State and head of the DAA.”

Jim Hacker: “Hello, Sir Humphrey.”

Sir Humphrey: “Hello and welcome.”

Bernard Woolley: “I believe you know each other.”

Sir Humphrey: “Yes, we did cross swords when the Minister gave me a grilling over the estimates in the Public Accounts Committee.”

Jim Hacker: “I wouldn’t say that.”

Sir Humphrey: “You came up with all of the questions I hoped nobody would ask.”

Jim Hacker: “Well, opposition is about asking awkward questions.”

Sir Humphrey: “And government is about not answering them.”

Jim Hacker: “Well, you answered all mine anyway.”

Sir Humphrey: “I’m glad you thought so, Minister.”

 - Yes Minister 3.5 Quote
52 plays

 Jim Hacker: “Sir Mark thinks there maybe votes in it. And if so, I don’t intend to look a gift horse in the mouth.”
Sir Humphrey: “I put it to you, Minister, that you are looking a Trojan Horse in the mouth.”
Jim Hacker: “If we look closely at this gift horse, we’ll find it’s full of Trojans?”
Bernard Woolley: “If you had looked a Trojan Horse in the mouth, Minister, you would have found Greeks inside. Well the point is that it was the Greeks that gave the Trojan Horse to the Trojans, so technically it wasn’t a Trojan Horse at all, it was a Greek Horse. Hence the tag Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes which you recall is usually, and somewhat inaccurately translated as Beware of Greeks bearing gifts. Or doubtless you would have recalled had you not attended the LSE. […] No well, the point is, Minister, that just as the Trojan Horse was in fact Greek, what you describe as a Greek tag is in fact Latin. It’s obvious really, the Greeks would never suggest bewaring of themselves if one used such a participle, bewaring that is, and it is clearly Latin, not because Timeo ends in ‘o’, because the Greek first person also ends in ‘o’. Though actually, there is a Greek word called Timao meaning I honour. But the ‘os’ ending is a nominative singular termination of the second declension in Greek, and an accusative plural in Latin of course, though actually Danaos is not only the Greek for Greek but also the Latin for Greek, it is very interesting really.”

Sir Humphrey: “Surveillance is an indispensable weapon in the battle against organized crime.”Jim Hacker: “You’re not describing politicians as organized crime?”Sir Humphrey: “No…well, disorganized crime too of course.”

Sir Humphrey: “Surveillance is an indispensable weapon in the battle against organized crime.”
Jim Hacker: “You’re not describing politicians as organized crime?”
Sir Humphrey: “No…well, disorganized crime too of course.”

 - Yes Prime Minister 2.1 Quote
119 plays

Sir Humphrey: “It is characteristic of all committee discussions and decisions that every member has a vivid recollection of them and that every member’s recollection of them differs violently from every other member’s recollection. Consequently, we accept the convention that the official decisions are those and only those which have been officially recorded in the minutes by the Officials, from which it emerges with an elegant inevitability that any decision which has been officially reached will have been officially recorded in the minutes by the Officials and any decision which is not recorded in the minutes is not been officially reached even if one or more members believe they can recollect it, so in this particular case, if the decision had been officially reached it would have been officially recorded in the minutes by the Officials. And it isn’t so it wasn’t.”

 - Yes Minister 1.7 Quote
69 plays

Jim Hacker: “Humphrey, is everything all right about the Solihull-project?”
Sir Humphrey: “Yes Minister, I understand that the building works are proceeding quite satisfactory.”
Jim Hacker: “No, no, that’s not what I meant. Is something going on?”
Sir Humphrey: “Building is going on, Minister.”
Jim Hacker: “No, no, Humphrey. I mean something is up, isn’t it?”
Sir Humphrey: “Yes indeed, Minister.”
Jim Hacker: “What?”
Sir Humphrey: “Well the first floor is up and second floor is almost…”
Jim Hacker: “No Humphrey, I am talking about the whole basis of the thing.”
Sir Humphrey: “Oh, I see.”
Jim Hacker: “What can you tell me about that?”
Sir Humphrey: “Ah…well, as I understand it Minister, the basis is an aggregate of gravel and cement on six feet of best builder’s…”
Jim Hacker: “Humphrey, I think you know I am talking about the finance!”

Jim Hacker: "Well, anyway. Why are we bugging Hugh Halifax? Is he talking to the Russians?"
Sir Humphrey: "No, the French actually. That's much more serious."
Jim Hacker: "Why?"
Bernard Woolley: "The Russians already know what we are doing."
Jim Hacker:”I have made a policy decision. I am going to do something about the number of women in the Civil Service.”Sir Humphrey:”Surely there aren’t all that many?”

Jim Hacker:”I have made a policy decision. I am going to do something about the number of women in the Civil Service.”
Sir Humphrey:”Surely there aren’t all that many?”

/adiv class=span style=